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#41 fezzasus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:55 AM

Probably to reduce the risk of losing oil pressure when cornering.


shouldn't be a problem in a dry sump system.

#42 Zoobeef

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:23 AM

There is that haha. Extra cooling capacity then.

#43 Bargi

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:30 PM

FYI. For anyone who predominately tracks their car, this oils is very good and a seriously good price: http://www.opieoils....chTerm=oldlabel


For £20 for 2 litres doesn't seem that good, is the oil that much better than say Fuchs Titan Race Pro S 10W-50 @ £40 for 5 liters?

Edited by Bargi, 09 January 2013 - 12:30 PM.


#44 siztenboots

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:36 PM


FYI. For anyone who predominately tracks their car, this oils is very good and a seriously good price: http://www.opieoils....chTerm=oldlabel


For £20 for 2 litres doesn't seem that good, is the oil that much better than say Fuchs Titan Race Pro S 10W-50 @ £40 for 5 liters?


the Pro S is ACEA A3, B3

#45 fezzasus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:55 PM


FYI. For anyone who predominately tracks their car, this oils is very good and a seriously good price: http://www.opieoils....chTerm=oldlabel


For £20 for 2 litres doesn't seem that good, is the oil that much better than say Fuchs Titan Race Pro S 10W-50 @ £40 for 5 liters?


Much better, As pointed out, it's ACEA A3/B3 which means wear or piston deposit performance is poor, I wouldn't really classify it as a high performance oil - the high performance oils tend to resort to marketing rather than proof of performance to sell oil. I've personally been part of the development of the Motul oil and compared it to a massive range of competitors, it's significantly better than the majority in terms of anti-wear performance and friction reduction. It will help your engine and should result in an increase in bhp vs. a standard oil, however it's a relatively small gain (3 or 4 % at a guess)

#46 JG

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

no 10w50 though

#47 Bargi

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:29 PM

Is the 15W OK enough for everyday driving? (not daily driver)

#48 siztenboots

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:30 PM

isn't the 15w more of a summer oil

#49 Winstar

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:37 PM

no 10w50 though


at the temperatures your car will see a 15w wouldn't be much different to a 10w

I've been trying to find the cuves but a 15w at the type of temperatures most of us would consider using a VX won't be thicker than a 10w at min temperature (usually about -20'C)

#50 hughcam

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:50 PM

I would say 3-4% is a massive gain on even a standard engine lol. Cheaper than buying exhaust and induction kits that probably provide around the same increase.

#51 fezzasus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:09 PM


no 10w50 though


at the temperatures your car will see a 15w wouldn't be much different to a 10w

I've been trying to find the cuves but a 15w at the type of temperatures most of us would consider using a VX won't be thicker than a 10w at min temperature (usually about -20'C)


Not exactly.

Temperature curves are dependent on the viscosity index (VI) of the oil, this differs depending on the base stock, thick additives and viscosity modifiers. Poor quality base stocks have low VI, high quality have high VI. viscosity modifiers have different VI depending on the application they are designed for.

For two oils with identical component slates (meaning they use components of the same quality at the same treat), a 20W-40 oil will have a lower total VI than a 0W-60, meaning the former will have a much lower gradient than the latter, the result of that is there is always a difference (although could potentially converge) in viscosities at a given temperature.

#52 fezzasus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:11 PM

isn't the 15w more of a summer oil


0W flows at -40 C
5W flows at -35
10W flows at -30
15W flows at -25
20W flows at -20

all will work in the winter, however for a daily driver where you just get into it and go in the winter i'd be happier with something thinner.

#53 fezzasus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:12 PM

Is the 15W OK enough for everyday driving? (not daily driver)


should be fine, fuel economy might drop a bit if you do lots of short distances.

#54 siztenboots

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:13 PM

no good for chips then

#55 fezzasus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:17 PM

no good for chips then


baby oil is just mineral oil and a scent, if it's good enough for babies it's good enough for chips.

#56 Steelic

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 09:13 PM

Fuchs supersyn 5w/40 5L is 21 from AGMpartscomponents behind Morrisons in Spalding. Delivery extra.

#57 fezzasus

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:36 PM


no 10w50 though


at the temperatures your car will see a 15w wouldn't be much different to a 10w

I've been trying to find the cuves but a 15w at the type of temperatures most of us would consider using a VX won't be thicker than a 10w at min temperature (usually about -20'C)


Posted Image

Knocked this up quickly, if anyone wants oil specific values let me know. They are all linear relationships and can be extrapolated as such (other than at less than 5 cSt). Notice how the monograde has a much steeper gradient, this is due to the lower VI.

#58 Winstar

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:02 PM



no 10w50 though


at the temperatures your car will see a 15w wouldn't be much different to a 10w

I've been trying to find the cuves but a 15w at the type of temperatures most of us would consider using a VX won't be thicker than a 10w at min temperature (usually about -20'C)


Not exactly.

Temperature curves are dependent on the viscosity index (VI) of the oil, this differs depending on the base stock, thick additives and viscosity modifiers. Poor quality base stocks have low VI, high quality have high VI. viscosity modifiers have different VI depending on the application they are designed for.

For two oils with identical component slates (meaning they use components of the same quality at the same treat), a 20W-40 oil will have a lower total VI than a 0W-60, meaning the former will have a much lower gradient than the latter, the result of that is there is always a difference (although could potentially converge) in viscosities at a given temperature.


Interesting I thought they had to conform to a certain SAE curve as the first job I did when I joined Lotus was program them all into the Flowmaster materials database, may be they where just some test sample then.

#59 fezzasus

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:15 PM




no 10w50 though


at the temperatures your car will see a 15w wouldn't be much different to a 10w

I've been trying to find the cuves but a 15w at the type of temperatures most of us would consider using a VX won't be thicker than a 10w at min temperature (usually about -20'C)


Not exactly.

Temperature curves are dependent on the viscosity index (VI) of the oil, this differs depending on the base stock, thick additives and viscosity modifiers. Poor quality base stocks have low VI, high quality have high VI. viscosity modifiers have different VI depending on the application they are designed for.

For two oils with identical component slates (meaning they use components of the same quality at the same treat), a 20W-40 oil will have a lower total VI than a 0W-60, meaning the former will have a much lower gradient than the latter, the result of that is there is always a difference (although could potentially converge) in viscosities at a given temperature.


Interesting I thought they had to conform to a certain SAE curve as the first job I did when I joined Lotus was program them all into the Flowmaster materials database, may be they where just some test sample then.


All viscosities can be modelled using A-BlogT = log log(v+0.7) where A and B are experimentally identified constants - it's how I created the graph above, because this produces a linear graph you can simply go off two experimentally measured kinematic viscosities (usually 100 and 40), but there's no need to conform to any SAE specification - only one KV at 100 C measurement is part of the specification and that identifies a working range for each SAE grade, the other measurement are high temperature high shear and cold cranking simulator which measure different attributes, the net result is an SAE grade is determined by three points on three different graphs, so there's nothing following a set curve.

EDIT: SAE grades are available on the last page of this: http://www.infineum....ations 2010.pdf

Edited by fezzasus, 10 January 2013 - 05:18 PM.


#60 Type 116

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 11:12 PM

That is the best explanation I have ever read regards what all the acronyms mean on me tub of oil! Now I just need some wynns oil treacle a the jobs a gooden!




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