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How To Stop Blowing Your Engine Up


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#1 alanwetherall

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 08:20 PM

Many years ago, I developed a racing engine at great cost. Because the radiator was behind me and I couldn’t see it or be aware when the water temperature was too high, we put in system to stop us blowing the engine up.

It went as follows

From a take off from the thermostat housing we fitted two sensor devices, one was hooked up to a large light on the dashboard (Actually it was a side light off a Mini) this would activate when the water temperature reached a certain temperature, the second sensor was set at just below boiling point and this was hooked through some sort of relay ?? and this would actually cut the engine off. I didn’t fit this system, an excellent local company completed it for me. They were the sort of company which specialised in car electrics and even repaired starter motors and alternators. Unfortunately, they have retired the business and are no longer available.

Before I take the VX onto track work I would like to find somebody who would develop this type of system for my VX. There may even be a commercial system in place.

Any help would be appreciated

Thanks alan

 



#2 hairy

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 08:29 PM

Not many VX engines blown up that I have heard of. Other than Joe..



#3 smiley

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 08:31 PM

I use a 10 pound usb dongle with a phone running the free torque app to display water temp.
You can set an alarm if it hits a threshold.

#4 techieboy

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 08:35 PM

The weakest point of the cooling system is the radiator. If that blows, you won't need a telltale light to know it's happened. At best there'll be coolant all over the windscreen and at worst, it'll be all over your face and hard to miss.

 

Your time/money/effort would be much better spent monitoring the oil level in the Z22SE.

 

Otherwise, it's a modern ECU managed engine that will stick itself straight into limp mode if it's sensors tell it something is amiss with the engine and the way it's running.



#5 swast4

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 09:26 PM

Hi Alan,
I was at Oulton yesterday and got speaking to a bloke who builds race engines/dynos etc.
He mentions he can build a system which I think he cashed it a track angel, where he can fit various external sensors water, oil temp, oil pressure etc he can configure it to alarm at different levels or cut the car out if in a dangerous state or not let you rev it until its warm etc.

I asked him how much and he was very cagey and wouldn't give a price, and just said how much is it worth to me???

I'd love it but suspect it will be alot of dosh?

If you pm me I can give you his name.

Adam

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#6 Madmitch

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 10:22 PM

I'm not sure a system that would actually cut the engine is a good idea.  Imagine a long corner like Gerards at Mallory Park, car nicely settled into the corner and foot well planted on the loud pedal when suddenly the engine cuts.  The back would almost certainly let go violently and you would be pitched into a huge spin at high speed with only a ditch and a bank for company!  I think a second warning light or a loud buzzer would be a better idea.



#7 pete-r

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 12:30 AM

I'm not sure a system that would actually cut the engine is a good idea. Imagine a long corner like Gerards at Mallory Park, car nicely settled into the corner and foot well planted on the loud pedal when suddenly the engine cuts. The back would almost certainly let go violently and you would be pitched into a huge spin at high speed with only a ditch and a bank for company! I think a second warning light or a loud buzzer would be a better idea.


This!

#8 Nev

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 08:30 AM

Creating your own electronics to light up a big red light on your dash (based on voltage output from a thermostat for example) would be quite easy. Look online there are loads of circuit diagrams for easy stuff like this. Would probably only cost £5 for the components and a few hours of your time.


Edited by Nev, 28 February 2019 - 08:35 AM.


#9 slindborg

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 08:48 AM

NEVER EVER CUT THE ENGINE LIKE THIS!!!!!

 

Not sure how familiar you are with the concept of SIL/ASIL, but as above, shutting the engine off "randomly" will present massive dangers to others and then yourself.

 

Warnings, yeah, go for it, Use the obd or as Nev says rig up something to read the temp sensor for the engine (either off the sensor with massive impedence or off the feed from the eCU but bear in mind with the Z22 atleast its a PWM signal and its not linear either).



#10 swast4

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 10:25 AM

Back peddle back peddle, please accept my apologies, I have interpreted wrongly, what he was telling me. It would restrict revs until it was warm and flash a big warning if there was something detrimental happening. Not shut down the engine mid corner 😧

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#11 alanwetherall

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 03:52 PM

Many thanks for all your comments

 

Hi just to clear things up, the system was designed to warn you first by a bloddy great light lighting up on the dashboard. This means slow down you are about to blow the engine before the next one kicked in. as it happened the light only went on once and that was due to a split hose. I think the comment about the ECU looking after the engine is probably the correct way to go



#12 Zoobeef

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 04:04 PM

You have a water temp light and an oil pressure light and an engine management light. That covers most eventualities.



#13 fiveoclock

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 06:33 PM

It's March 1st tomorrow not April 1st

#14 Bakazan

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 07:30 AM

the second sensor was set at just below boiling point and this was hooked through some sort of relay ?? and this would actually cut the engine off. I didn’t fit this system, an excellent local company completed it for me.

 

As it's a pressurised system the coolant can go some way above normal boiling point and the fan does not come on until 106C.....or do you mean boiling point at pressure?

 

This seems like a fix for a problem that's not there?



#15 Aerodynamic

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Posted 02 March 2019 - 07:46 AM

I dont see the issue. You have gauges
to warn you about these things.

I have set my fan to 91 degrees.
But never reaches above 87 degrees track driving.

#16 slindborg

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 09:22 AM

 

This seems like a fix for a problem that's not there?

 

 

Seems like a problem for a fix that isnt needed :lol:



#17 Nev

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 09:23 PM

I dont see the issue. You have gauges
to warn you about these things.

I have set my fan to 91 degrees.
But never reaches above 87 degrees track driving.

 

That must be the advantage of driving in sub-zero Scandinavian temps!

 


Edited by Nev, 06 March 2019 - 09:24 PM.


#18 slindborg

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Posted 07 March 2019 - 05:32 PM

Can also run too cold aswell as too hot :lol:






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