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Wishbone Bolt Tightening At Ride Height


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#1 Cooperman

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 09:52 AM

I am doing a suspension refresh using OEM bushes but stupidly I didn’t think to measure the position of the hubs relative to the ground before dismantling. I have the workshop manual ride heights, although I have TD wheels (16 front, 17 rear) but wondering how accurate I need to be at getting the suspension at the correct position before when torquing up the wishbone bolts. 
 

This has been a much longer project than I anticipated due to finding a host of other jobs along the way - Would really like to avoid damaging the bushes on reassembly!

 

Advice please.



#2 chris_uk

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 10:08 AM

just put the shockers back on and then do it at that. 
 



#3 Ormes

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 10:28 AM

I put the shockers back on and removed slack by jacking beneath the balljoint.



#4 Cooperman

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 10:55 AM

I have calculated the correct hub centre line height from the ground using the 140mm OEM ride height (ground to chassis rail) adjusted for the cars current height off ground while it’s on stands. I have allowed 6mm for tyre compression.

In a quick trial using a jack under the lower wishbone I did have to compress the shock quite a distance to achieve the correct height. 

 

Based on the feedback it sounds like I’m being over cautious? 



#5 jonnyboy

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 11:00 AM

Get a measurement from someone with a car sat on the floor measure floor to hub centre and just replicate the height with a jack. You should end up then with the twist in the bush only occurring when the suspension is compressing or drooping. I don't think its too crucial as a lot of movement at the hub is a snallee twist at the bush but its worth getting reasonably close.

#6 Cooperman

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 11:29 AM

Get a measurement from someone with a car sat on the floor measure floor to hub centre and just replicate the height with a jack. You should end up then with the twist in the bush only occurring when the suspension is compressing or drooping. I don't think its too crucial as a lot of movement at the hub is a snallee twist at the bush but its worth getting reasonably close.

Thanks Jonnyboy

 

Any volunteers please who have an NA with standard bilsteins to measure hub centre to chassis rail distance for front and rear wheels? 



#7 jonnyboy

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 04:14 PM

I can get one off a vxr tomorrow if you have 16 inch fronts?

#8 Cooperman

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 04:52 PM

I can get one off a vxr tomorrow if you have 16 inch fronts?

Yes, I have 16” fronts (205/50).

 

Thanks for the help. 



#9 909

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 06:59 PM

 

I can get one off a vxr tomorrow if you have 16 inch fronts?

Yes, I have 16” fronts (205/50).

 

Thanks for the help. 

 

Place a couple of wheel nuts to hold the disc to the hub then rest both front discs or rear discs on blocks of wood to take the weight of the car.  






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