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Rear Brake Caliper Service Kit


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#1 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:45 PM

I obtained this kit by post from Christopher Neil Lotus at a cost of £33.86 + VAT I understand that as with Vauxhall, some Lotus dealers will try and charge above the recommended price for service parts such as this. I understand Christopher Neil has a word of mouth reputation for not charging excessive prices.

I know that many here are as capable (if not more) as me in taking on a task like this without instructions and ‘making it up as you go along’.
So this is an idiot’s guide intended for those who might wish to attempt what is a fairly simple but fiddly job, but who are less experienced, and I’m the idiot who wrote it. :P

The kit consists of the following items, as in the picture.

· Blued steel top slider
· 2 rubber boots to fit either end of top slider
· Lower plain steel slider/pivot bar
· Lower slider bar rubber sleeve
· White plastic insert for lower rubber slider sleeve
· Tube of Brembo white grease for component assembly/lubrication

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Edited by oblomov, 11 May 2005 - 11:33 PM.


#2 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:47 PM

Tools required

Suitable piece of softwood whittled to a tapered screwdriver blade shape with blunt end. I used a piece of 3/8 dowel for this.
Torque wrench with 17mm socket
17 mm spanner
Allen keys
Long nose pliers
Soft head mallet
Blowtorch
Threadlock thread sealer
Silicon/Rubber spray lubricant.

Comment: The only part on my car that required replacement was the outer top slider rubber boot. However, having obtained the full service kit, I took the opportunity to replace all parts supplied. This seemed sensible in view of the relatively inexpensive cost of the kit.


Note:

· Removal of the handbrake cable end will assist in the removal and replacement of the lower pivot bar rubber sleeve. If left in place the cable inhibits access somewhat. I did not discover this until I came to do that particular task. I must say that with care I managed quite well with the handbrake cable in place, and would not remove it were I to do the job again. However, if you decide to remove the handbrake cable, now is the time to do it while the brake is still held in place. Judge yourself from the picture.

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#3 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:50 PM

· The amount of grease in the tube supplied should be more than sufficient for the job with some left spare.

· Avoid the use of oil/petroleum-based lubricants on rubber as they can cause perishing. Silicon based lubricants are generally safe, and will not cause contamination of brake fluid if also used to clean/lubricate the rubber boot of the caliper piston.

METHOD

Assuming relevant wheel has been rmoved

REMOVAL OF TOP SLIDER COMPONENTS

Remove brake pads as described elsewhere here. Thoroughly clean all brake surfaces with suitable cleaner.

Unscrew brake disc retaining screw using suitable Allen key.

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#4 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:52 PM

Remove brake disc by striking rear gently, with soft headed mallet, and after each strike, rotate disc 4 to 5”. My disc came off relatively easily. Others may require more force, especially if they have not been removed since the car was new.

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#5 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:53 PM

Using the ‘suitably' prepared’ piece of wood prise outer lip of outer top slider rubber boot (nearest you) out of retaining groove and lever boot towards you, over the outer end of the slider.

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#6 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:55 PM

Place finger inside boot and press slider towards the opposite side of the caliper and as opposite boot stretches, again use wood to prise boot lip out of piston groove, but this time the boot slides on to the piston body as you continue to press and slide the piston out of the caliper body. When the groove in the piston body meets the lip of the rubber boot inside the caliper body, resistance may be felt. If this happens it is important not to FORCE the slider, as it will cause damage to the boot by pinching the inner lip. Instead, coax the piston through by gently turning and pulling until the resistance releases and the slider can then be fully withdrawn form the caliper body. Remove both rubber boots.

Thoroughly clean and degrease slider/piston rubber boots and examine for signs of wear. Check exposed ends of piston for rust. Carefully stretch each rubber boot in turn, looking for punctures or signs of wear or perishing. The boots if serviceable may be re-used, or retained as spares for use at a later date.

Thoroughly clean/degrease the piston bore in the caliper, paying particular attention to the two grooves situated just inside both outer ends.

Now is a good time to use the long nose pliers or suitable tool to screw the brake piston clockwise fully back into the caliper body, (remove brake fluid reservoir cap first) taking care not to allow the plier ends to skid out of the holes on the piston face and damage/puncture the brake piston rubber boot.

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#7 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:57 PM

REMOVAL OF CALIPER FROM LOWER SLIDER BAR

Fully tiled back, press caliper away from you off the lower slider bar. It may be necessary to work the caliper backwards and forwards if it is stiff. Once removed do NOT allow caliper to HANG by its own weight unsupported. Without kinking the brake hose, you should be able to lodge the caliper on the under tray to the rear of the rear toe link bar.

REMOVAL OF BOTTOM SLIDER BAR

The bar is retained by a bolt with an Allen key slot in the end.

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#8 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 10:59 PM

If this bolt is tight to unscrew (likely – Threadlock) do not risk rounding the Allen key slot by forcing. Instead with the blowtorch apply heat to the region of the hole where the bolt is screwed until bolt turns easily, and can be removed.

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#9 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:01 PM

Remove bolt from bottom slider bar. Remove steel slider sleeve from bolt.

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#10 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:02 PM

Hold head of bolt in a vice and use a wire brush to clean and remove excess thread lock from the bolt thread. At the same time also clean the thread of the top caliper retaining bolt in the same manner.

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#11 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:04 PM

REMOVAL OF BOTTOM SLIDER RUBBER SLEEVE

The sleeve is removed from the (rear) brake cable side of the caliper and access is somewhat obstructed by the cable. This is easily overcome by using long nosed pliers to grip the rubber.

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#12 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:05 PM

At the same time use the piece of wood on the opposite side of the caliper to press the lips of the sleeve away from the caliper edge and pull the sleeve out. The rubber composition of the sleeve is more robust than that of the boots and will withstand judicious gripping by the pliers without damage. From inside the rubber sleeve, carefully remove the white plastic insert.

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#13 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:09 PM

Clean/degrease slider bar, rubber sleeve and plastic insert and examine for wear/corrosion/perishing. Replace as necessary.
Clean/degrease slider bar hole in piston body.

REPLACING LOWER SLIDER BAR RUBBER SLEEVE IN CALIPER BODY

To lubricate and assist the insertion of the rubber sleeve, use a proprietary silicon/rubber lubricant, sprayed directly into the caliper aperture.

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#14 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:10 PM

The rubber sleeve itself should not be lubricated, thus helping grip. Use the long nose pliers to hold the rubber sleeve, folded in the manner indicated in the photo, which is of the old sleeve being held to demonstrate

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#15 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:12 PM

As stated earlier, if gripped gently but firmly the rubber of the sleeve is sufficiently robust to allow this handling without damage. With the pliers in one hand, insert the rubber sleeve into the caliper body, and placing a finger on the outside end of the sleeve, hold it in place inside the caliper as you release and withdraw the pliers. The longer and thinner the nose of the pliers you use, the easier this is to accomplish.


Using the fingers, work the sleeve fully home into the caliper body. By examining the opposite end you can check when the sleeve is fully home because the lips are designed to overlap outside onto the caliper body.

Once you are satisfied the sleeve is correctly seated, insert the inner white plastic sleeve into the rubber sleeve as shown in the picture.

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#16 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:13 PM

Push inner white sleeve insert fully home. The rubber sleeve outer lip mentioned earlier can be clearly seen in this picture

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#17 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:15 PM

REPLACING LOWER SLIDER BAR

Place steel bar on retaining bolt. Apply Threadlock to thread of bolt, or apply Threadlock directly to threaded hole into which bolt screws.

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#18 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:16 PM

Insert by hand before tightening bolt to correct torque setting

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#19 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:17 PM

Open grease tube and apply to slider bar. Avoid using too much; a thin smear is all that is required.

Align caliper and carefully insert end of slider bar into rubber sleeve and slide caliper slowly fully home, taking care to be aware of any resistance which might indicate that the white plastic sleeve has not seated correctly within the rubber sleeve.

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#20 oblomov

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:20 PM

REPLACING TOP SLIDER AND RUBBER BOOTS

Smear the inside surface of both rubber boots with grease.

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